Home Opinion Dear Editor Money from signs only for marketing

Money from signs only for marketing

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I am part of the original disappointed youth of Roswell, the group that was promised a pool in high school. Yes, the first of many disappointed youth in this town, and that was over 30 years ago.
There are three kinds of people in this world; proactive, reactive and inactive. Proactive people see problems before they happen and work toward fixes. Reactive people only move after the damage is done and inactive — well that is what the city of Roswell has been for decades. Roof leaking, oh well, someone will take care of it later. Pool leaking, oh well, let someone else deal with it and the list of inactivity goes on and on and on.
Unfortunately, Roswell has been inactive for decades, that the current council and staff must now be reactive while striving to be proactive. Yucca and Cahoon both needed updates and repairs long ago and nothing was done, forcing the closure of both facilities. I wonder; would new construction take place if the old facilities were still occupied? History has a way of repeating itself.
The closures are inconvenient. The youth of Roswell now have to interact with the seniors of Roswell, how horrible! Maybe, just maybe our seasoned citizens can inspire our most impressionable citizens and our most impressionable citizens can inspire our most seasoned citizens. I think we all can use a dose of civility.
The money spent on the entry signs could not have been used to repair Yucca or Cahoon. The money must be spent on marketing. The citizens of Roswell didn’t pay for the signs, our tourists paid for them through lodgers taxes.
Heaven forbid we take the money left by the people who travel here to look at aliens to provide a new alien feature. How dare us give them what they want. Speaking with a few tourists this week, they expected to see more alien-focused businesses and attractions.
Many want to remember Roswell before the crash but the crash is what kept Roswell from crashing. Take your blessings where you can get them.
My youth disappointments are no longer valid; it is not about me anymore. It’s about my children and my grandchildren that I must work to improve their opportunities and community. I want them to enjoy where they live, to improve their community and love thy neighbor.
I want them to be proud of their roots and still embrace the future for whatever it holds. I want them to put their differences aside and work toward the greater good. I want that for you, too.
Kerry Moore
Roswell