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Boggs looking to give back in the great sport of wrestling

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Jesse Boggs (Submitted Photo)

Jesse Boggs has compiled a long list of accolades as a competitor in the sport of wrestling and hopes to do even more as a mentor, father, teacher, and coach. The second-year head coach for the Roswell High wrestling team has garnered many awards and is looking to do even more while building a good, strong tradition for the Coyotes.

Coach Boggs started wrestling due to a pride issue – he didn’t want to be upstaged by a classmate. “There was a kid that I thought was annoying and inferior to me and he asked me if I was going to wrestle. I told him ‘of course’ because if he was going to do it then I couldn’t back down so to speak.” This long ago event happened at Camino Real Middle School in Las Cruces in the 8th grade.

Boggs moved to Deming for his high school years and won the heavyweight state title three times. He is the only Deming Wildcat wrestler ever to do this. He won in 2003, ’04, and ’05 and graduated in ’05.

“To be honest, sophomore year was a blur,” said Boggs. “I don’t think I was very tough that year, but I kind of just rolled in and did a lot of upsetting. I was definitely the dark horse that year – it was really a shock win at that weight. It was really unexpected.”

The state titles won in ’04 and ’05 were not upsets as Boggs had become a feared heavyweight. In the spring of ’05, Boggs became an all-American by placing 8th in the nation at Senior Nationals which earned him a scholarship to Dana College in Blair, Nebraska.

“I was looking to wrestle somewhere and nothing materialized until nationals and that’s when Dana College recruited me.” At Dana, he was part of a national championship team while also qualifying for nationals.

He transferred to New Mexico Highlands and proceeded to be a two-time national qualifier while being a two-time All-academic all-American.

Following his college career, Boggs decided to try his hand at coaching and knew that this was what he wanted to do full time. “My goal was always to get my degree and move back to Deming and take over the wrestling program and make Deming into a dynasty. As I transitioned into things, I wasn’t sure if I was going to go into coaching. When I got done with my college career, my coach (at Highlands) Doug Moses asked if I would stay around and help the heavyweights so I did for several years.”

“When James Martinez took over the Robertson high school program, he asked if I would coach the middle school team, so I took over the middle school coaching job and it was a lot of fun.” This was in the 2015-16 school year. By the Fall of 2016, he was employed at Roswell Schools and had taken over the Roswell High program.

“We were just looking at different options – my wife and I – and I kind of put out feelers in different places and I never really thought I would move to Roswell, but on a whim, I checked their job situation and saw that the wrestling position was open. I called and within two weeks I was hired as a teacher and the head wrestling coach.”

Coach Boggs knows he made the right decision with the move to Roswell. “I really like it here. There are a lot of opportunities here for my children but it still has that small-town feel. It’s nice to come somewhere where there is a vast history like at Roswell High, but lately it’s (the wrestling program) not been performing where it has been in the past. It’s fun to come and build a foundation and get people excited about wrestling here at Roswell High again and build up the program.”

Coach Boggs explained that coaching wrestling is a great endeavor and he looks forward to being able to help kids achieve their goals in life through the sport.

“Besides my faith and my family, wrestling is the third most influential thing in my life. It teaches accountability. It gave me so much and I have had success in life because of it. It is a sport that is hard work and determination and those things will you go far in life – not just the mat, but far in life. I think wrestlers do well. They progress well in their career and as citizens and so that’s why (I coach).”

Coach Boggs explains that he is very content working and living in Roswell with his wife Autumn and his three sons. He is currently a freshman English teacher and looks forward to helping the kids at Roswell reach their goals – in the classroom, on the mat, and in life.

“For now, I’m looking at the next ten years is Roswell. I don’t foresee myself moving even after those ten years – things change, life happens, but as long as we’re doing well and the kids are growing, I’ll be in Roswell.”

The goal for a dynasty in Deming has indeed changed to a goal for a dynasty at Roswell High.