Home News Local News Two Roswell Incident authors review findings

Two Roswell Incident authors review findings

0
The International UFO Museum and Research Center in Roswell has a replica of a mandible casting made by dental technician John Mosgrove in October 1979 that six anthropologists have examined. According to information displayed at the museum, all laboratory scientists have verified the authenticity of the mold as having been made from actual teeth and gums and all said that casting does not match any known species on Earth. At left is a casting of a human mandible. (Lisa Dunlap Photo)

Two longtime researchers in the Roswell incident think they have good evidence that extraterrestrials were aboard the object that crashed north of Roswell in 1947.

Tom Carey and Don Schmitt, two of the best-known researchers and authors concerning the Roswell Incident, said that they were given a replica of an impression of a mandible made by dental technician John Mosgrove, a replica now on display at the International UFO Museum and Research Center.

Carey and Schmitt said that Mosgrove has told them as well as other reporters that he came to believe that the teeth were from extraterrestrials kept at Wright Patterson Air Force Base in Dayton, Ohio, originally Wright Field, the depository for the Roswell crash site debris. They also say that several anthropologists from around the country have declared that the mandible impression is not from a known animal on this planet.

“Each and every one of them has concluded it is not from any species on this earth,” Schmitt said.

As the second day of the 2018 UFO Festival got underway, Carey and Schmitt presented their case for the alien origins of the crash object and the bodies some say were found with it during their Saturday morning talk, “The Roswell Crash Aftermath.”

The day was filled with talks by investigators, writers, abductee experiencers and witnesses, filmmakers and other UFO enthusiasts giving presentations at the museum and at other venues in the city. Meanwhile, vendors filled North Main Street, costume contests occurred, the planetarium held special shows and Galaticon and the Sci-Fi Film Festival continued at the Roswell Mall.

Talks and events will continue at various locations today.

Mosgrove, the dental technician, was promoted as a special phone-in guest at Carey and Schmitt’s talk, but he was unable to participate due to a family emergency, according to Schmitt.

Schmitt said that Mosgrove was working at a Veterans Administration hospital lab in October 1979 when he was ordered by his boss to make a casting of some teeth by the next morning — without the work order that typically accompanies such tasks.

Mosgrove reportedly thought at first the teeth came from an animal until he realized that they looked more human than animal. Schmitt said Mosgrove’s suspicions also were heightened because he saw his boss crumple and throw away the original impression used to make the casting. The he supposedly watched as the boss handed the casting he made to Wright Patterson Air Force officers.

According to Schmitt, those actions prompted Mosgrove to retrieve the crumpled impression and make more castings, which he kept in a locked bank security box for decades. In 1995, he told his story to a NBC TV reporter, but the casting went back into a locked box again for many years until Schmitt and Carey began to talk to Mosgrove.

Carey and Schmitt also reviewed other facets of what they contend was a cover-up by the U.S. military from 1947 until 1978. That’s when Jesse Marcel, a Roswell Army Air Base major who had gone to the crash site in 1947 and been sworn to silence, began to talk about what he had experienced and witnessed.

According to the authors, the evidence of the cover-up includes affidavits from people who were threatened with death if they spoke about the debris they had seen or handled; interviews with people who have said that they saw the “mystery metal” that floated or could not be torn, burned or destroyed; eyewitnesses to the large egg-shaped spacecraft that was convoyed down Main Street to the air base; information about pilots transporting bodies to Wright Field; and interviews with a family who had been hosts to then-Lt. Gov. Joseph Montoya iwhen he had seen bodies at the Roswell air base days after the crash that he had said were “not human,” an experience that supposedly left him rocking back and forth in the car and caused him to gulp liquor straight from the bottle.

Among the strongest evidence that what crashed in Roswell was other-worldly, Carey and Schmitt say, is Marcel’s words. Schmitt said Marcel was the “No. 1 intelligence officer” in the United States in 1947, working at a military base that had responsibility for planes that carried atomic bombs.

According to Schmitt, Marcel said about the debris he handled, “Being familiar with all materials both foreign and domestic, this was nothing made on this earth.”

Senior Writer Lisa Dunlap can be reached at 575-622-7710, ext. 310, or at reporter02@rdrnews.com.