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Free one-on-one advice for electronic devices

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Did you recently get a new mobile device or laptop? Having trouble with an old one? Still not sure how to use the library’s digital resources? Come by the Roswell Public Library on any Tuesday from 2 to 3 p.m. to get one-on-one help from our knowledgeable staff on navigating the basics of your device and learning about the digital resources the library has to offer. For more information, you can visit the website at roswell-nm.gov/405/, call 575-622-7101 and like us on Facebook.

Book Talk by Robert Briggs
Circulation Supervisor

The universe is both poetic and mathematical, subjective and objective, beautiful and terrifying. We are very much a part of the universe, the culmination of a molecule’s journey to become aware of itself, and perhaps even evidence that the universe is sentient. Still, there is so much we don’t know about it. We barely understand anything about our own corner of space, yet we are constantly striving to learn more about everything around us, both near and far.

The more scientists learn, the more that they don’t know, and this is even truer for us lay people who look to the stars, wondering what exists beyond our solar system. Fortunately, astronomers have documented their findings, and together with writers and artists, they have made it a bit more comprehensible. The Roswell Public Library has plenty to offer for those who wish to learn just a little bit more about outer space.

Roger D. Launius’ “The Smithsonian History of Space Exploration: From the Ancient World to the Extraterrestrial Future,” is an ode to humanity’s fascination with space. It starts by examining the ancient’s view of space and how it shaped their civilizations. From devising charts to calculate the passage of time throughout the year to developing the zodiac and applying spiritual meaning to the movement of planets and their alignment with stars, it is clear that space was every bit as revered in antiquity as it is nowadays.

The book continues into more modern times, documenting the great space race between Russia and the United States, and detailing the hard work that astronomers and astronauts put into learning about our vast existence. Pictures and drawings enhance the book, bringing to life the history of our race’s enchantment with outer space. It’s a wonderful read for everybody who wants to know more about humanity’s relationship with the stars. It can be found in Adult Nonfiction, call number 629.4 L371s2.

PBS Nova is a wonderful documentary series that helps bring understanding to science and math, and “Invisible Universe Revealed,” written, produced, and directed by Peter Yost, is no different. Released in 2015, it celebrates the quarter-century of images sent back to Earth from the Hubble Space Telescope. It explains how the telescope was almost considered a failure due to a small engineering mistake, but through the bravery of astronauts, it was repaired and able to send back pictures and data that show that the universe is richer than we could have possibly imagined. The images have helped scientists gain a better understanding of the unseen forces that hold existence together, and have fueled the human imagination for more than 25 years. This is a must see for all who look at the night sky and feel inspired by its majesty. “Invisible Universe Revealed” can be found in the DVD section, call number 522.2919 In8.