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Food for thought — and art

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Submitted Photo "The Trinity Site,” by Jeremy Howe, 2019, green and red chile jam, chocolate and white chocolate syrup on canvas. The sculpture is part of the Miniature Museum’s Domesti Collecti exhibition.

Domesti Collecti exhibition opens and includes workshop

Submitted

The latest collections exhibition at the Miniatures and Curious Collections Museum, 320 N. Richardson Ave., is installed. It is titled, “Domesti Collecti: Collections and Art from Home and Refrigerator” and features salt and pepper shakers, rolling pins, creamers, washboards, soap, a miniature confections artwork tower by Justin Richel and a plethora of Jeremy Howe’s paintings made with food. These creamy, colorful artworks have titles such as “Hot Colony” and are made with strawberry glaze and lemon filling.

On May 4 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., the public has a chance to create their own food art when MCCM is hosting Howe’s come-and-go workshop Play with your Food. The workshop is free of charge. From 4 to 6 p.m., the public is invited to view the exhibition and enjoy a piece of cake.

Howe, who is the Roswell Museum and Art Center Planetarium Director, has been making food art since 2002, although he pre-dates his inspiration back to the late ’70s when his mom — the Miniature Museum’s founder, Elaine Howe — decorated sugar cookies in wild, intense and colorful designs. “Those sugar cookies very much acted as mini-canvases for artistic expression,” Jeremy Howe said.

In 2002, Howe was living in Oaxaca, Mexico, enjoying the chocolatiers and dulcerias — candy stores. “There were raw, granular pastes of chocolate, target-patterned marshmallows and richly colored rice wafers — cultural items that I had never seen before,” Howe said. “This was fantastic to me; that I suit-cased them home and used them as art supplies in my paintings.” Besides ants, the biggest challenge working with food products as art materials is the technical challenges of adhesion, and the compatibility of materials. Howe, however, treats these as chemistry challenges, using his science and geological background as needed. Besides food, Howe has also worked with fireworks as well as traditional items like ink on paper. “I am a multimedia artist that spans the gamut between use of traditional painting techniques, such as oil, to curious experimental alternative media, like fireworks and food art, “ Howe said. “Much of my work explores color relationships and non-representational marks. For the most part, I work on paper.”

The exhibit Domesti Collecti is going to be up until mid-June. MCCM’s regular hours are Thursday thru Saturday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The nonprofit museum has a wide variety of miniatures, room boxes and displays, rotating curious collections exhibits and a kids’ play area. For more information, email roswellmccm@gmail.com or call 575-208-0662.