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Terminal expansion plan recommended

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Airport Advisory Commission members have recommended a terminal expansion concept so that consultants can request funding to pay for architectural and engineering design. Mayor Dennis Kintigh, at head of table, chairs the city commission. Dane Marley, to Kintigh’s left, and Bud Kunkle are commission members. City Councilor Judy Stubbs chairs the council’s Legal Committee, which often considers the recommendations made by the commission prior to final votes by the Roswell City Council. (Lisa Dunlap Photo)

Airport Advisory Commission prefers ‘hybrid’ option

A concept for a renovated airport terminal has been recommended by a city commission, which also suggested repairing rather than demolishing an older structure damaged during a March windstorm.

The city of Roswell Airport Advisory Commission, chaired by Mayor Dennis Kintigh, voted to recommend allowing consultants to work with a “middle option” plan for an estimated $26.9 million terminal renovation as they prepare funding requests to pay for more in-depth engineering plans and cost estimates.

The group also voted during its Thursday meeting to repair a damaged World War II-era building, contingent on insurance funding. That matter will now head to the Roswell City Council and its committees for a final decision.

‘Hybrid’ option selected for now

Adam Ambro of Gensler, a design and architectural firm, made an updated presentation to the commission regarding concepts for the airport terminal at the Roswell International Air Center.

“We have already planned it, but there are still a lot deeper and different conversations that need to take place,” said Ambro. “That’s part of what we wanted to do today, is share the different alternatives we have developed and share some of the pros and cons of each.”

Funded by a New Mexico Department of Transportation grant, the terminal expansion study is not intended to develop final architectural designs, but rather provide concepts about how best to resolve crowded conditions for some airport functions and accommodate future growth in commercial airline service, passengers and vehicle traffic.

The city of Roswell has two American Airline flight operations to Phoenix and Dallas, but it has begun efforts to attract another airline for service to a third city, with Denver seen as a likely destination at this point. The existing terminal could not accommodate such growth, Air Center employees have said.

Ambro discussed three concepts, with the commission deciding after a lengthy discussion to allow Armstrong Consultants Inc., the city’s airport planning consultants, to work with option three as the consulants begin drafting funding requests to pay for architectural and engineering design. In making its recommendation, the commission was advised by Armstrong Consultants that funding agencies likely will allow the city to amend its plans if needs or circumstances change.

The “hybrid” option is a middle option between a more simple renovation estimated at $22.99 million that would not solve all known overcrowding issues and a more extensive renovation estimated at $29.78 million that would require significant inconveniences during construction.

Option Three entails expansion of the two existing wings of the terminal to provide more space for rental cars in one wing and the ticketing and baggage check-in functions in another. But it also includes a new addition to the south of the existing building to be built on a small portion of the tarmac. Ambros said that the addition would allow for an improved passenger experience by creating space for additional gates, a larger passenger lounge and expanded security-check areas. A secure courtyard also would be a possibility under this option.

The commission also debated but ultimately decided against recommending the construction of an entirely new terminal building at this point in the discussion process. Commission members and consultants concluded that the existing structure is still sound, although in need of mechanical and electrical upgrades; that federal or state funding for a portion of the project is more likely for a renovation than a new structure; and that a new building could necessitate other work, including demolition of other buildings and relocation of parking areas.

Gensler also presented a couple of options for improving parking at the terminal. Two major concepts of the plans were to create alternative traffic paths so that not all vehicles have to travel in front of the terminal entrance and to move long-term parking at least 300 feet from the terminal.

According to commission members and Armstrong Consulting staff, the funding for design might come from a Federal Aviation Administration Municipal Airport Program grant. But the city also will need additional funding mechanisms for construction, including possibly issuing bonds to be repaid by increased lodgers taxes or airport-related fees.

Repair recommendation

The commission decided to recommend to the Roswell City Council repairing Building 72, a 22,000-square-foot warehouse leased by an airport tenant that was damaged during the high winds and gusts that occurred in the area March 13.

City of Roswell Project Manager Kevin Dillon said that preliminary discussions with an insurance company indicate that the company probably will pay $450,000 to repair the roof. The city would then contribute $150,000 to upgrade and repair exterior doors and replace the existing lighting with more energy-efficient LED lighting.

He said demolition of the building, constructed in 1942 and containing encased asbestos, is estimated at $409,765.

Commissioners voted to recommend renovation to the City Council, provided that the insurance company is willing to pay for the roof repairs.

Other items

The group also discussed the recent military pilot training that occurred at the Air Center and the storing of grounded Boeing aircraft at the airfield.

• Air Center Director Scott Stark said that the Navy Training Air Wing 4, part of the Chief of Naval Air Training Command based in Corpus Christi, Texas, was pleased with its experience at the Air Center. The group was in Roswell from late January until about April 10 to provide entry training for aviators from various military branches. Stark said that the group initially planned to have 25 airplanes on site and conduct 4,000 flight hours of training but decided as training progressed to bring an additional 10 planes, and were able to do more than 7,000 flight hours of training. He said the command expressed being happy about many plans to return next year if its budget allows.

• A maintenance and repair operator at the airport, AerSale, is storing four Boeing 737 MAX aircraft for American Airlines, with the possibility of additional planes arriving soon. The 737 MAX was ordered grounded by the Federal Aviation Administration on March 13, with the order remaining in effect until concerns about its computerized navigation system are addressed. Initial investigations have indicated that the software system and the lack of adequate pilot training concerning it could have resulted in two overseas airplane crashes. According to American Airlines statements, the airline has 24 Boeing 737 MAX aircraft in its fleet and has decided to ground them until Aug. 19, which has led to the cancellation of 115 of its daily flights. Roswell’s air service is not impacted by that decision. The airline has announced that it expects the FAA to remove the grounding order before August, but that the decision was made to keep their aircraft out of service until mid-August so that it could best plan for summer air traffic.

Senior Writer Lisa Dunlap can be reached at 575-622-7710, ext. 311, or at reporter02@rdrnews.com.

City presents project updates at public forum

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City Engineer Louis Najar addresses the audience at the public forum on Thursday evening. Deputy City Manager Mike Mathews is also pictured. (Alison Penn Photo)

The city of Roswell’s most recent public forum, focused on operations and public works, covered topics related to sanitation, water and more.

Approximately 20 city employees and 10 citizens were present at the nearly two-hour forum at the Roswell Convention & Civic Center at 912 N. Main St. City councilors Jeanine Corn Best and Judy Stubbs thanked citizens for attending, encouraged them to bring their friends to forums and also encouraged citizens to report what they see and use the city’s online Fix-It form for issues.

For the first 45 minutes, city officials from the airport, central control/water production, facilities maintenance, and solid waste gave presentations on their departments and what they bring to the city — as well as project updates.

After department presentations, citizens listed the following items to be discussed: trash trucks, the city subsidizing the county’s trash in the city landfill, trash and litter going into waterways, street resurfacing, citizen responsibility for trash, and domestic water wells.

Deputy City Manager Mike Mathews thanked attendees for coming to the forum, and city staff for putting together information for presentations. Mathews offered a tour of the wastewater treatment plant for interested parties.

“You see tonight from all the presentations — this isn’t a cheap operation,” Mathews said. “We’re talking multimillion-dollar projects in just these services of providing water to everybody, sewer to everybody, trash pick-up for everybody. It’s a multimillion-dollar operation, and you’re absolutely right, we have to watch everything that we do, make sure that what we’re charging for our service is appropriate.

“I’m not saying that we take advantage of anybody, but we’re doing appropriate fees for the type of services that we’re providing to our community and those outside.”

City Engineer Louis Najar addressed streets and said the realignment of Stone and Montana from a 90-degree turn to an S-curve is finished and was opened last night.

Najar said in terms of street resurfacing that a contractor conducts the crack sealing twice a year and it takes eight years for the same street to be resealed.

In regard to sanitation, Steve Miko, director of sanitation, recycling and landfill, said the schedule and map for grappler truck pick-up should be made public by the end of May. Miko also said flyers will be going out to citizens, encouraging them to bag their trash and keep lids on lidded receptacles.

For domestic water wells, Najar said there is a source water detection plan in the works with the New Mexico Environment Department to protect waterways. A couple of years ago, Najar said the city looked into implementing a well ordinance that would forbid new wells, but not prohibit use of existing wells. He said there were 1,000 private and permitted wells at that time and the city uses 20 wells. A meeting on the topic will be held on May 14 at the Roswell Adult & Recreation Center at 807 N. Missouri with more information to be released by the city.

A meeting for the bicycle and pedestrian master plan was announced for May 2, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Roswell Public Library, to seek residents’ input for biking and walkability around the city.

City/RISD reporter Alison Penn can be reached at 575-622-7710, ext. 205, or at reporter04@rdrnews.com.

Anderson, Pirtle talk legislative session

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From left, state Sen. Cliff Pirtle and state Rep. Phelps Anderson – both Republicans from Roswell – speak at the April meeting of the Chaves County Federated Republican Women Wednesday at the Elks Lodge in Roswell. The two lawmakers discussed the recent 60-day legislative session in Santa Fe that ended March 16. (Alex Ross Photo)

A month after a lively legislative session ended, two local lawmakers shared their thoughts about the recent legislative session Wednesday at the April meeting of the Chaves County Federated Republican Women.

The 60-day legislative session was the first time in eight years Democrats were in full control of state government. In all, about 310 bills passed both chambers of the Legislature, most of which was signed into law by Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham.

State Sen. Cliff Pirtle, R-Roswell, whose Senate district includes Chaves, Eddy and Otero counties, said some of the battles during the session were between Democrats and Republicans or between the House and the Senate.

The biggest division though that played out on the floors of each legislative session were between lawmakers from urban areas and against those from New Mexico’s more rural parts.

An issue that brought that fight to the forefront was the debate over Senate Bill 8 (SB 8). The law, which passed both legislative chambers and was signed into law by Lujan Grisham, requires federal background checks be conducted for most gun sales in New Mexico, including private gun sales.

The law that is set to go into effect July 1 has generated opposition from the majority of the state’s 33 county sheriffs, many gun owners and Republican legislators who say it will do little to deter crime and only infringe upon the right of law-abiding citizens to keep and bear arms.

In all, 27 of the state’s 33 counties — including Chaves County and the city of Roswell — voiced their displeasure with the law by passing resolutions and ordinances stating opposition to any law that conflicts with the Second Amendment right to keep and bear arms and that they will not authorize resources to enforce such laws.

Pirtle told the audience Wednesday that he applauded Chaves County Sheriff Mike Herrington, the Chaves County Board of Commissioners and members of the Roswell City Council for speaking out against the law. He said their vocal opposition made it easy for himself and other legislators to be against the bill.

“It made it super easy to stand up, make the points about why it was bad legislation and why we needed to defeat it,” he said.

Pirtle said throughout the session he spoke out against state legislation that dictates what communities throughout the state should be doing. He said the state government should not be making decisions that are handled best by municipal and county governments.

A bill to gradually increase the state’s minimum wage and another that nullifies local right-to-work ordinances and resolutions were two examples of issues taken up that are best handled at the local level.

“This is what our country was founded on, that a local jurisdiction has the most control over the constituents that they represent,” he said.

Many of the bills, Pirtle said, were attempts to impose a statewide solution on what he called “an Albuquerque problem.”

One such example of a bill that did that but was defeated would have required a private property owner to give 14 days notice before they tow away a vehicle that was abandoned on their property. The bill was ultimately defeated.

“That’s an Albuquerque problem. Why are we looking for a statewide solution? Why are we going to take your private property rights and say you don’t have the right to private property?” he asked.

One of the few clear victories for conservatives during the session was when the Senate voted down a bill that would have repealed a 50-year-old state law outlawing abortion in New Mexico.

House Bill 51 (HB 51) would have repealed the statute enacted in 1969 that outlaws abortion in New Mexico. The law has not been enforced since 1973, when the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that abortion was protected under the right to privacy in the U.S. Constitution.

Abortion rights advocates however, worry the statute could again be enforced if the Supreme Court overturns Roe V. Wade.

Ultimately, a handful of more conservative Democrats joined with Republicans in the Senate to block passage of the bill.

“That is one of those times when you are sitting on the Senate floor and you are really, really, really proud of your colleagues,” Pirtle said.

He said the conservative Democrats that helped block HB 51 are the people that conservative Republicans need to support.

“It’s going to be a Democrat in that seat, we need a good conservative Democrat that will stand up for property rights, for business and for life,” Pirtle said.

It is important going forward for Republicans to build partnerships across the aisle who can help stop what he called bad legislation and support good legislation.

One bill that Pirtle said passed that he was against was a bill that would award the state’s five electoral votes to the presidential and vice presidential candidates who receive the most nationwide or popular votes in a presidential election. The measure would only take place when states with a combined 270 electoral votes adopt similar legislation.

Pirtle said he believes the legislation is unconstitutional and would diminish the political power of rural states and areas in presidential elections.

Last November, Phelps Anderson, a Republican from Roswell, was elected to represent House District 66 in the New Mexico House of Representatives. The district includes parts of Chaves, Lea and Roosevelt counties. Anderson had served in the New Mexico House from 1977 to 1981. As he had during his first two terms in the House, this year Anderson served on the House Appropriations and Finance Committee.

He said that the state budgets are now about 10 times bigger than they were the last time he was in office.

“We used to argue about tens of thousands of dollars, and now we’re more focused on millions,” Anderson told the audience.

Unlike many other recent sessions, the state is experiencing a record $1.1 billion surplus. As a result, the coming fiscal year that starts in June will see a budget of $7.1 billion.

He said included in that spending is $933 million in capital outlay projects in legislative districts. Chaves County will receive $9.9 million of that money in the coming fiscal year for local infrastructure projects.

Unlike some other legislative years when capital outlay is paid for through bonds, this year the Legislature paid for it through the state’s general fund, Anderson said. He said that is one of the biggest accomplishments this session and that it will leave the state in better longterm fiscal health.

Anderson also defended the way capital outlay funds are allocated to each lawmaker. He said what projects get funded are decided with local input and the system that is in place allows lawmakers from outside major populated areas to get funds.

Southeastern New Mexico sends a great deal of tax money to Santa Fe, but he said that part of the state often has a difficult time getting that money back from the state for local needs.

Despite the budget surplus, the Legislature passed and Lujan Grisham signed a bill that will increase several taxes throughout New Mexico. The state includes, among other things, an increase in vehicle excise tax rates.

Anderson said that in a session when the state has a surplus of revenue and a $7.1 billion budget, it does not make sense to raise taxes.

“Now you lay that logic out and some people just look at you like you are talking to a telephone pole,” he said.

Anderson added that he sees two challenges that were not addressed this session that could have longterm implications for the state.

The first is the state’s film tax credit. He said the tax credit meant to encourage filmmaking in the state of New Mexico only benefits Santa Fe and Albuquerque. The benefits, he said, are not seen throughout much of the rest of the state.

“I think in the state of New Mexico where we have a required balanced budget, this is a credit card that is out there and you need to pay attention to it,” Anderson said.

The second pressing matter he said is the state’s underfunded pensions for teachers and state employees. New Mexico is going to have to make some decisions going forward about those pensions, he said.

“Good decisions today are going to fix it,” Anderson said.

Breaking news reporter Alex Ross can be reached at 575-622-7710, ext. 301, or at breakingnews@rdrnews.com.

Man sentenced for assaulting a police officer

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A Roswell man was sentenced Monday in Fifth District Court to serve six months in the Chaves County Detention Center after he discharged a weapon and then punched a Roswell Police officer in the face.

Judge Dustin Hunter sentenced Edward Lucero, 50, on one charge of battery upon a peace officer and one count of negligent use of a deadly weapon. Lucero pleaded guilty to the charges.

Lucero was sentenced to 18 months in prison, with one year of the sentence suspended. He will serve six months in prison followed by one year of probation. A 182-day sentence on a charge of negligent use of a deadly weapon was also suspended, and he will serve five months and 30 days on supervised probation.

Lucero was ordered to undergo drug and alcohol screening and take part in an anger management course.

A third charge of resisting, evading or obstructing an officer had been dismissed by the prosecution, according to court documents.

The charges stem from an April 4, 2018 incident, according to an affidavit. At 7:46 p.m. that evening, two officers were dispatched to a 600 block South Delaware Avenue residence in reference to a shots fired call. The caller reported that about six or seven shots were fired.

Officers made contact with a man later identified as Lucero, who denied that any shots were fired. He told the officers that his family were avid shooters and that the shell casings on the ground at the scene were there because they must have been knocked off of his vehicle, according to the affidavit.

A loud noise that sounded like a firework went off and Lucero became irate and started complaining about the poor response time by police when he calls 911. Lucero added that he had been unloading a grill from his truck and maybe that was the noise neighbors had reported hearing.

Both officers then went and questioned two other neighbors who reported hearing gun fire that had come from Lucero’s residence. The officers then returned to the address Lucero was at, according to the affidavit.

Lucero was already angry when the officers returned. Lucero kept yelling at his son to go back into the house but officers did not want him to because of a comment made about the family being avid shooters and that it was probable guns were in the house, according to the affidavit.

While Lucero was yelling at his son to go back inside, he stepped in front of one of the officers. The officer then grabbed Edward’s hand and told him that he was under arrest, according to the affidavit. He then punched the officer in the face.

An altercation ensued when Lucero continued and the assaulted officer punched Lucero in the side of the face in an attempt to gain control and end the fight, according to the affidavit. Lucero was then turned over onto his stomach and handcuffed.

The affidavit states that Lucero later admitted that he punched the officer.

“I’m not going to lie. I did hit him, I struck first,” Lucero said in the affidavit.

A search warrant was obtained, and a handgun was later found in a pull-behind trailer connected to a pickup truck that Lucero’s family said he drives. Spent shell casings were also found by officers near the pickup.

When asked by officers about the spent casings and the gun, Lucero later admitted to police officers that he did fire some shots into the ground, according to the affidavit.

Breaking news reporter Alex Ross can be reached at 575-622-7710, ext. 301, or at breakingnews@rdrnews.com.

Local ‘Drug Take Back Day’ occurring next week

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The Roswell Police Department’s Neighborhood Watch program will again be part of National Prescription Drug Take Back Day.

An initiative of the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), the event offers citizens an opportunity to prevent pill abuse and theft by ridding their homes of potentially dangerous expired, unused and unwanted prescription drugs.

The public can bring unwanted and unneeded prescription drugs to the Take Back Day event Saturday, April 27, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Roswell Police Department, 128 W. Second St., where the Neighborhood Watch office is located.

The service is free and those bringing prescription drugs can remain anonymous, no questions asked. Please note, however, the DEA — which will dispose of the collected items — cannot accept liquids or needles. Only pills or patches are accepted during this event.

The twice-a-year Take Back Day — the other day is in October — has seen citizens from Roswell and the surrounding area turn in large quantities of pills at each event in recent years. Since Roswell began participating in the event in 2011, local citizens have dropped off a total of 5,144 pounds of old and unused prescription drugs. The drugs turned in at the Roswell event and other local events throughout the nation are retrieved by DEA officials for disposal by incineration.

This initiative addresses a public safety and public health issue. According to the DEA, medicines that languish in home cabinets are susceptible to misuse and abuse. Rates of prescription drug abuse in the United States are high, as are the number of accidental poisonings and overdoses due to these drugs. Studies show a majority of abused prescription drugs are obtained from family and friends, including from the home medicine cabinet. In addition, officials say disposing of unused medicines by flushing them down the toilet or throwing them in the trash creates potential safety and health hazards.

For more information about National Prescription Drug Take Back Day, visit DEATakeBack.com. People can call Richard Lucero at Roswell Neighborhood Watch at 575-624-6770 ext. 4131 or 575-420-1369 for more information.

Shooting from motor vehicle reported on West Summit

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The following public records are from the Roswell Police Department and can be viewed at rpdp2c.org. All people arrested or cited are presumed innocent.

A shooting at a dwelling or occupied building from a motor vehicle was reported at 5:14 a.m. April 17 at the 900 block of West Summit Street.

Arrests/citations

Philip Gonzales was charged with possession of drug paraphernalia at 2:31 p.m. April 12 at the 200 block of South Main and East Alameda streets.

Felix Vallejos was charged with disturbing contents of a trash receptacle April 12 at 6:14 p.m. at the 2000 block of Pennsylvania Avenue.

Mason Cast was charged with selling or giving alcohol to minors at 10:12 p.m. April 12 at the 700 block of North Main Street.

Antonio Martinez Jr. was charged with driving under the influence of intoxicating liquor or drugs at 5:01 a.m. April 13 at the 700 block of West Adams Drive.

Markys Zaragoza was charged at 12:38 p.m. April 13 with possession of marijuana at the zero block of West Martin Street.

Phillip Magill was charged with possession of drug paraphernalia at 10:15 p.m. April 13 at the 700 block of East Country Club Road.

Scott Fierro was charged with possession of marijuana April 14 at 9:52 p.m. at the 1800 block of North Main and West 19th streets.

Kayla Duncan was charged with possession of drug paraphernalia at 10:30 p.m. April 14 at the 600 block of West Ninth Street and North Washington Avenue.

Michael Rodriguez was charged with battery upon a peace officer April 15 during a 9:47 p.m. call at the 200 block of Country Club Road.

George Ortiz was charged with concealing identity and being a fugitive from justice at 2:14 a.m. April 16 at the 300 block of East Reed Street.

Mikel Kinney was charged with assault upon a peace officer April 16 at 5:48 p.m. at the 800 block of West Deming Street.

Michael Robinson was charged with possession of marijuana April 16 during a 10:35 p.m. traffic stop at the 100 block of East Ninth and Main streets.

Richard Morales was charged with possession of marijuana at 7:19 p.m. April 17 at the 1400 block of West Hendricks Street.

Chris Salazar was charged with possession of marijuana at 11:17 p.m. April 17 at the 900 block of West McGaffey Street and South Union Avenue.

Stephen Lacey was charged with driving under the influence of intoxicating liquor or alcohol at 3:02 a.m. April 18 at the 600 block of West College Boulevard and North Washington Avenue.

Robert Avila was charged with failure to appear, failure to pay fines and possession of drug paraphernalia at 10:51 p.m. April 18 at the 600 block of East Forest Street.

Arson

An officer responded April 14 at 9:22 p.m. in reference to a suspicious container next to a vehicle at the 800 block of Twin Diamond Drive.

Criminal damage

An officer was dispatched at 11:29 a.m. April 12 to a 1000 block of Ivy Drive address in reference to criminal damage. A tail light lens valued at $250 was reported damaged.

A corrugated marquee sign valued at $150 was the subject of a criminal damage call reported at 11:17 a.m. April 13 at the 2000 block of North Garden Avenue.

A 6-foot privacy fence valued at $350 was reported damaged at 4:06 p.m. April 14 at the 100 block of East Albuquerque Street.

An officer was dispatched to the 2000 block of West Second Street at 5:15 p.m. April 15 in reference to a disorderly subject. A window valued at $200 was reported damaged.

An officer responded at 12:30 a.m. April 19 to a criminal damage call at the 1100 block of West Second Street in reference to a damaged driver’s-side quarter panel on a Buick, valued at $300.

Theft/larceny/burglary

An officer was dispatched to an 1100 block of South Main Street business at 3:13 p.m. April 13 in reference to a shoplifting that had occurred at 1:42 p.m. Four decorative trees with a combined value of $99.96 were reported taken.

A 2008 Chevy was reported stolen at 11:31 p.m. April 13 from the zero block of East Morningside Drive.

A vehicle battery valued at $224.99 was reported stolen at 8:08 p.m. April 15 from a 1300 block of South Main Street business.

An officer was dispatched to the 1000 block of South Mulberry April 16 at 5:49 p.m. in reference to a larceny. Some Oxycodone was reported stolen.

An officer was dispatched to a 100 block of East Deming Street address at 3:59 p.m. April 17 in reference to a larceny. A speaker system, speaker cable, projector and extension cord with a combined value of $840 were reported stolen.

An officer responded to a call April 19 at 6:49 a.m. at the 600 block of Adams Drive in reference to a stolen 2007 Chevy Tahoe.

A Toro lawnmower valued at $500 was reported stolen at 9:17 p.m. April 18 from the 1300 block of West Seventh Street.

Goddard scares No. 1 team in the state

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Goddard’s Jordan Rincon throws a pitch. (Steve Notz File Photo)

There was nothing going good for the Goddard Lady Rockets in their district doubleheader against Artesia on Friday.

After all, they were playing the state’s No. 1 ranked softball team in District 4-4A, that was evident by Artesia’s dominance in game one, which they mercy-ruled Goddard, 20-0. In game two, Goddard played better, losing the second game of the twin-bill, 7-1.

“After that game, I told the girls to keep their heads up, we still had one more game,” said Goddard coach Katie Shanor. It seemed like Shanor had something up her sleeve prior to the second game.

The surprise was pitcher Jordan Rincon — she relieved Kristina Casaus in the third inning of game one when the game was out of hand.

In game two, Rincon was virtually untouchable. She struck out two Lady Bulldogs and kept the hitters off balance. “They all (Goddard and Artesia players) do a lot of travel ball together, and if there is one person who knows them best, it’s Jordan,” said Shanor.

Artesia coach Sandra Smith blamed their lack of hitting in game two on, “We just came out flat, we had just beaten them pretty well in game one,” said Smith.

However, the defending champs looked unmotivated in game two, while the Lady Rockets played their hearts out because they wanted to beat Artesia.

“Our girls came out hungry, and we had nothing to lose,” said Shanor, and the Lady Rockets played like it.

Artesia did take an early 1-0 lead, as they put down a bunt single followed by a double, which drove in a run for a 1-0 lead.

After that, Rincon was like a dog with a bone. She wasn’t overwhelming but the placement of her pitches fooled hitter after hitter. “Some people are street smart, others are book smart, but Jordan is softball smart,” Shanor explained.

The Artesia batters had doubles, triples and home runs in game one, but could barely put the bat on the ball in game two. Artesia hit meek fly balls, pop-ups in the infield or hit the ball at someone.

The Goddard defense showed signs of brilliance, they dove and stopped balls that were headed into the outfield, other times they backstabbed missile-seeking spheres that could have turned into extra-base hits.

“The team could have given up, but they didn’t. I told them after the game how proud of them I was,” Shanor said

Artesia is not No. 1 for nothing. “We had to put them away and we were struggling at the plate,” said Smith. But on the mound, freshman pitching sensation, Rylee Crandall kept the Lady Rockets at bay.

Crandall recorded 14 strikeouts including the last two of the game. Goddard already had a run-in with two Lady Rockets on base. “If any of their upcoming hitters gets a hit or an extra-base hit, this is a much different game, and we’re in a dog fight,” said coach Smith.

Artesia hung to win its 14th game of the year. Just about every softball fan in New Mexico knows about the Lady Bulldogs’ mystic, however, the Lady Rockets put a chink in their armor Friday night. “That’s where we strive to be,” said coach Shanor, “and we’ll have to take defeats like that trying to get there.”

And in game one, Artesia sent 11 batters to the plate and produced 10 runs in the second inning. However, had the Lady Rockets executed a key play in the inning, they may have escaped with only giving up just a couple of runs.

“We made some defensive miscues that kept the inning alive for them,” Shanor pointed out. And a couple of other mistakes from Goddard in the third inning opened the flood gates for Artesia.

Artesia sent 13 batters to the plate and chased Casaus to the showers in the third inning.

Artesia’s Crandall, in three innings of work, gave up no hits, no runs, and faced nine batters.

The Lady Rockets played with determination and grit Friday night, it just didn’t show on the scoreboard and win column, yet.

Noon Optimist Little League baseball action

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Above: A Brewers player fields a grounder. Below: A Diamondbacks pitcher gets ready to throw a pitch. (Arnold Roe Photos)

Goddard blanks Lovington

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Goddard used the power pitching of Drew Price as he threw a one-hitter as Goddard exploded for six runs in the fifth inning, to defeat Lovington on Friday, 11-0. Noah Nunez had four hits to pace the Rockets offensively. (Dawn Scott File Photo)

042019 Alton’s Power Block Athletes of the Week

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Alton’s Athletes of the Week are Goddard basketball player Xavier Garcia, left; and Goddard girls basketball player Alexis Sandoval, right. Also pictured in the center is Alton’s employee Izhai Hernandez. (Shawn Naranjo Photo)

Gary William Auld

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Gary William Auld, 76, passed away on Wednesday, April 3, 2019, in Roswell, New Mexico.

On July 21, 1942, Gary was born to Gil Auld and Bessie Opstad Auld in Seattle, Washington. At the age of 16, he met the love of his life and future wife of 53 years, Lila Kay Auld. Gary and Kay have a beautiful family that include their son, Chris, daughter-in-law Dawn and Grandson Connor; daughter Debbie, son-in-law Ryan and Granddaughters Emily and Amanda. Gary also leaves behind is brother Dennis and sister-in-law Lynn.

From 1960-1966 Gary attended Portland State and received his B.S. in Psychology.

In 1966 Gary joined the Oregon Air National Guard as a Crew Chief and SSGT and was known as “Airman Auld”. He was part of the 142nd Consolidated Aircraft Maintenance Squadron (142d CAM Sq) and was in the Airforce for 6 years.

He enjoyed working in sales and merchandising for 25 years and after retirement from the Coors Brewing Company he became a manager/owner of the Roadrunner Mobile Home Park in 2005. Gary was a man of faith and was President and Property Manager at St. Mark’s Lutheran Church. He was the Charter Representative for the Boy Scouts for several years.

He had an amazing personality and treasured spending time with family and friends. Gary was an avid golfer and sports fan who loved the Broncos.

Gary’s life motto was Listen-Learn-Lead.

It is with a thankful heart that we extend our gratitude to all those that were involved in Gary’s care.

A Celebration of Life Service will be held at St. Mark’s Lutheran Church, 2911 North Main, Roswell, NM 88201 on Saturday, April 20, 2019 at 11:00am. Please wear something RED.

In lieu of sending flowers, please send donations to St. Mark’s Lutheran Church.

Arrangements have been entrusted to Ballard Funeral Home and Crematory. An online registry can be accessed at www.ballardfuneralhome.com.

Theresa June White (Terry Lindsey)

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Theresa June White (Terry Lindsey) 65 years old passed away March 25, 2019 due to Mytonic Dystrophy at her home. She was born in Artesia, NM October 26, 1953 to Steve and Anita Lindsey.

Terry is survived by her beloved husband Ron White in Albuquerque, NM for 35 years, her mother Anita Hartley, sister and brother-in-law Debbie and Van Blessing, brother, Mike Lindsey in Roswell, step brother Ricky Hartley and his wife Terri in El Paso, and Randy Hartley in Indiana. She has several nieces Lindsey Blessing Parsons, Shannon Hartley and Rachael Hartley and nephew Warren Hartley and Zachary and several great nieces and nephews She is also survived by her Mother-in-law Varena White and sister-in-law Darlene and Bill Jones in Texas. She has an aunt and uncle and cousins in New Mexico and Texas. She left behind a beloved pet dog “Shorty” and loving neighborhood friends.

Terry graduated from Roswell High School in 1971, she had worked at various jobs Coca Cola Plant, Robert O. Anderson and Mountain Bell. She had retired from Mountain Bell. Terry and Ron loved watching sports together, her favorite team Dallas Cowboys.

Terry and and her husband decided on no memorial service; she was cremated and her ashes will spread in memorable locations. “Death leaves a heartache no one can heal love leaves a memory no on can steal.”

James Wesley Smith

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James Wesley Smith, 86, went to heaven on March 6, 2019.  The family will hold a Celebration of Life Memorial Gathering at 10:00 am on Saturday, April 20, 2019 at Enchanted Hills Park in Roswell.

James was born to Clyde Smith and Loma Frazier on September 7, 1932.  They were farmers and James grew up learning to work hard.  He became a plumber by trade and worked many years in this profession.  He loved country music and he was an outstanding country and western dancer.  Dancing was one of his favorite things to do.  He was known by those who loved him as Shorty.  James was a loving dad and granddad and will be dearly missed.

James is preceded in death by his parents, Clyde and Loma Smith; his daughter, Judy Darlene Lane; and his wife, Barbara Smith.

James is survived by his son-in-law Albert Lane; his granddaughter Jennifer Williams and her husband Nick; his granddaughter Kimberly Putnam and her husband TJ; his great-grandchildren Devin Williams, Koltin Willis,  Madelynn, Maya, and Keigan McCullough;  very dear friends Desmond Williams, Anna Sanchez, and Judy Powers.

Commissioners hear plans for wind farm

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Chaves County’s benefit from a planned 61-turbine wind farm would include construction jobs and tax payments, says Brian Sarantos of EDF Renewables North America. (Lisa Dunlap Photo)

Chaves County would have about 31 of the 61 turbines in the $300 million site

A northern California renewable energy company plans to build a $300 million wind generating site in southeastern New Mexico, with about half of the turbines to be located in Chaves County.

Brian Sarantos, senior development manager of EDF Renewables North America of Oakland, California, part of an international conglomerate, talked about the company’s plans to build the Oso Grande Wind Farm on Thursday during a Chaves County Board of Commissioners meeting.

EDF Renewables has entered an agreement with Tucson Electric Power to build the wind farm in Chaves, Lea and Eddy counties and then transfer ownership to the electric company when the project is completed, expected to be December 2020.

“One of the questions that gets asked a lot (about) the community benefit is that if this power is being sold to Tucson, then Chaves County, Eddy County and Lea County won’t get any of that power, and that’s actually not true,” Sarantos said. “The way the electrons work is that, if you pull the switch closest to wherever that power is, that’s who gets the power.”

The project will be the largest clean energy site for Tucson Electric, which will enable it to meet renewable energy production requirements and goals, according to a news release. The Oso Grande farm will provide double the renewable energy production required by Arizona state regulations and come close to the company’s own goal of 30% alternative energy production by 2030, according to a news release.

“They don’t have the wind that you have,” Sarantos said, as he confirmed the assertions by Commissioner T. Calder Ezzell Jr. that Tucson Electric chose New Mexico for its abundance of wind and then will trade electricity generated from the Oso Grande Wind Farm with other power companies.

As part of the development efforts, Oso Grande Wind LLC filed April 1 for a special-use permit, an application scheduled to be heard May 7 by the Chaves County Planning and Zoning Commission and by the Board of Commissioners on May 23. The company is seeking permission to erect about 31 wind turbines in the county on 11,000 acres of ranching and oil and gas property near the Caprock area by state highways 172 and 249. The total project in all three counties involves about 24,000 acres and 61 turbines, Sarantos said.

When completed, the Oso Grande site will generate about 247.7 megawatts of energy, enough to power about 100,000 homes. In Chaves County, about 150 megawatts is projected. The wind farm is also expected to reduce carbon emissions by 688,000 metric tons annually compared to the same amount of electricity generated by fossil fuels.

The benefits to southeastern New Mexico, Sarantos said, include 100 to 200 construction jobs, four to 10 full-time permanent jobs to operate the farm, $15 million in annual lease payments to six private landowners and $30 million in taxes over the lifetime of the project to the three counties, with Chaves County expected to receive a significant portion of the money.

The project also will include switch stations, roads, collection lines and gen-ties, some of which will cross not only private land but also U.S. Bureau of Land Management property and state-owned parcels. Sarantos added that the company already has begun work with federal and state agencies for easements and permits. The company, which finances its own projects, wants to begin the major part of its construction work in September.

EDF Renewable’s prior projects in New Mexico include the Roosevelt Wind Farm and the Milo Wind Farm, both in Roosevelt County and both supplying electricity to Southwestern Public Service Co. Commissioner Jeff Bilberry, who lives near the Roosevelt Wind Farm near Elida, said he has not heard any complaints about that operation.

Sarantos added that the company intends to work cooperatively with the oil and gas businesses in the area.

“We do recognize that oil and gas is a big part of this county and this state,” he said, “and so we are not here necessarily to compete with these guys but we are here to work with them.”

Tucson Electric is now owned by Fortis, a public electric and gas distribution company based in Canada. EDF Renewables is part of EDF Group, an international energy group with a publicly traded parent company based in France. EDF Renewables operates in 22 countries to develop, build and run renewable energy sites.

Senior Writer Lisa Dunlap can be reached at 575-622-7710, ext. 311, or reporter02@rdrnews.com.

Another stop on Mathys’ campaign trail

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Chris Mathys stands in the meeting room of the Roswell Daily Record Tuesday for an interview. Mathys, a self-described “conservative Republican” from Las Cruces is campaigning to be the Republican U.S. House candidate in 2020 for New Mexico’s 2nd Congressional District. Mathys hopes to unseat incumbent U.S. Rep. Xochitl Torres Small, D-NM, in November of 2020. (Alex Ross Photo)

With the 2020 elections more than a year a way, Chris Mathys is already hitting the campaign trail in hopes of being the Republican to take on Democratic U.S. Rep. Xochitl Torres Small in New Mexico’s 2nd Congressional District.

A 61-year-old commercial lender and real estate broker from Las Cruces, Mathys is a former city council member from Fresno. Last year, he lost by 23 votes in a race for a seat for the New Mexico Public Regulation Commission.

Mathys has spent the last few months traveling across the sprawling 19-county southern New Mexico district in a gray pickup truck. In the bed of the truck is an American flag and a large sign emblazoned with his name and the words “conservative Republican.”

He has spent his time introducing himself to voters at events such as a meeting of the Portales Co-op and at monthly meetings of the Chaves County Federated Republican Women. For a Republican to win, Mathys said that it is important to have strong support in Chaves, Eddy and Lea counties.

“I want to meet every single voter I can, personally,” Mathys said in an interview Tuesday.

He added that when talking with voters, he gives each person a business card with his personal cellphone number and tells them to call him if they have any questions or concerns.

“I want them to know who Chris Mathys is. I want to look at them in the eye and I want them to be able to have access to me,” Mathys said.

Mathys said part of the reason he is running is to bring some partisan balance back to what is now New Mexico’s all-Democratic congressional delegation.

“So it’s important to me that the Republican voice be heard,” she said.

Last year, the normally Republican U.S. House seat was picked up by Democrats when Torres Small narrowly defeated Republican candidate and former state Rep. Yvette Herrell of Alamogordo. Herrell in January officially announced she would run for the seat again in 2020.

Mathys said his campaign is more grassroots than Herrell’s.

Focusing on small contributions and not receiving money from what he calls special interests is very important to Mathys. He said far too often, people who don’t give to campaigns feel ignored.

Part of the problem with Washington D.C., Mathys said, is that those special interests hold too much sway. Mathys has raised $76,000 since Jan. 1, according to campaign reports with Federal Election Commission, compared with $284,985 raised by Herrell in that same period. Torres Small has $452,866 in her campaign account.

Part of the reason Republicans did not win the seat was because they did not work hard enough, Mathys said. He also blames Herrell for not taking part in public debate forums with Torres Small. He said if he is the nominee, he will take part in debates.

Despite also being from Las Cruces, Mathys said he has never met Torres Small, but said the first few months of her term have been a disappointment.

He cites Torres Small’s vote to elect Nancy Pelosi as speaker of the House as an example. During her campaign, she did not commit to voting for Pelosi, saying she would vote for a candidate for speaker, who recognized the needs of rural New Mexico.

Torres Small in January threw her support behind Pelosi. Torres Small said she did so because Pelosi had listened to her about the need to ensure greater access to healthcare in rural areas.

“So that tells me again, she is a typical politician,” Mathys said.

Immigration

Border security is something Mathys said he thinks is a top priority. He supports President Donald Trump’s declaration of a National Emergency, which allows Trump to shift money from military infrastructure projects to use to build a wall along the southern border.

Majorities in both the House and Senate voted to disapprove the declaration, but did not muster the votes needed to overturn Trump’s veto of the resolution.

“We have a lot of money and we spend a lot of money on a lot of things, and to me, our primary goal is to protect Americans, and right now our border is too porous and is not being enforced properly,” he said.

Mathys said he agrees with Trump’s description of the situation on the southern border as a crisis.

He said that he does not think someone can be serious about border security if they do not support a wall. A wall along the entire southern border is not practical though, Mathys said.

In some areas along the border, a wall is not possible, and there are some sections of the border where a person cannot physically cross.

“Wherever someone can physically cross, we need to have a barrier,” Mathys said.

He said he also would back a proposal tweeted out by Trump this weekend to transport all people who enter the country illegally to sanctuary cities. Many of those cities such as San Fransisco are concerned with caring for people in the country and therefore should be willing to care for those people.

Albuquerque is a sanctuary city. He was unsure if his hometown of Las Cruces was, but said if they are, they will have to help care for those migrants.

“Las Cruces is going to have to bite the bullet, too,” Mathys said.

Trade

Trump has threatened to impose tariffs on products from countries that engage in unfair trade practices, something that Mathys said he supports. Tariffs are sometimes necessary to make sure foreign countries are abiding by the rules of trade agreements.

“If China wants to trade with America, China needs to be fair about it,” Mathys said.

Healthcare

Mathys said that improvements need to be made to make healthcare. He said that on the campaign trail, he speaks to families that are paying thousands a month for health insurance for three people. Universal healthcare though, is something that Mathys said he does not support.

“I don’t think it’s the role of the taxpayers to pay for medical insurance for everyone,” he said.

Congress needs to come up with a healthcare solution, but Mathys said he does not know yet what that solution will look like. He said any healthcare plan will have to keep intact protections for those with pre-existing conditions.

“If someone has a pre-existing condition, it would not be fair to put that person in a box and say, ‘Sorry, you are not going to get any help,’” he said.

Trump

New Mexico was carried by Democrat Hillary Clinton in the 2016 elections, but Mathys said that does not mean he is worried about being a Republican on the ballot with Trump. He said the strong economy and legislation signed by Trump to reduce taxes will work to his benefit in winning re-election in 2020 and possibly winning New Mexico.

Mathys added he would be honored if Trump came to New Mexico to campaign for him.

Breaking news reporter Alex Ross can be reached at 575-622-7710, ext. 301, or at breakingnews@rdrnews.com.

Occupational therapist to speak Friday

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Nohemi “Emi” Grahel, an occupational therapist at Eastern New Mexico Medical Center, is the Healthsense speaker Friday at 11:30 a.m. The talks are held at Senior Circle, 2801 N. Main St. next door to Family Dollar in the Wilshire Center. Grahel will explain occupational therapy and some of the tools that can be used.

Healthsense is free and open to the public. A light lunch will be served. For more information, call 623-2311.

Waterline project to impact North Garden traffic

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A pair of intersections along North Garden Avenue will be closed at times during an approximately three-week period beginning Monday, according to a press release from the city of Roswell.

Contractor crews will be doing preliminary work for an upcoming waterline replacement project.

The intersections to be closed are North Garden and East Third, followed by North Garden and Cherry. During the closures, traffic will be able to access North Garden to the north and south of the involved intersections.

Access to North Garden between the intersections — about a five-block stretch — will be available via East Fifth Street.

The contractor will also accommodate as much as possible access for local residents and businesses near the affected intersections, according to the press release.

Beginning Monday, the contractor will be digging to uncover existing pipes to measure them so new pipes can be ordered for the replacement work scheduled to begin June 10. At that time, street closures will again be necessary along North Garden.

Roswell Coyotes still have a chance

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Roswell’s Taymon Burrola gets ready to hit against the Robertson Cardinals last month. (Marcus Gonzales File Photo)

The magic number of wins for Roswell Coyotes’ baseball season to be considered a success is one. One win and a berth in the playoffs. Getting the one win is going to be harder than anyone can imagine. What the one victory means is Roswell baseball has had their best baseball season in a decade.

Roswell’s first-year coach Tyrell Curtis has to be the sickest guy in a Coyotes’ uniform. Curtis received a gem of a pitching effort from sophomore Taymon Burrola. He turned in his finest pitching performance of the year. He threw a four-hitter, struck out five batters and picked off two base runners off first base in a 4-1 loss to Hobbs at Joe Bauman Stadium Thursday night.

“He has been able to do that,” RHS coach Curtis said. “He gave us a chance to win that game. There are things we have to go back and do. I thought we hit the ball well that game and he (Burrola) pitched his tail off for us. We got to be able to string hits together. Hobbs is a really good baseball team.”

Coming into the game, Roswell was trying to avenge an 11-1 loss to Hobbs on Tuesday. Burrola started the game on fire with three up and three down. It was in the second inning when Hobbs’ Brevin McCool doubled with two outs and moved to third base on a wild pitch — he would score when teammate Roe Forrest hit the ball over first base for a base hit scoring McCool as Hobbs took a 1-0 lead.

Hobbs scored a run in the third inning, but Roswell came back when the speedy Rhett Stokes hit a ball to the edge of the grass at shortstop and beat out the throw. Stokes stole second base on the second pitch and would end up scoring when Raul Guzman singled to left field as the Coyotes trailed 2-1.

“I think the loss in the first game,” Curtis stated, “is going to come back and cost us. Our team never quit, our team kept swinging the bats.”

In the fifth inning, Hobbs scored two runs on errors to give them a 4-1 lead, which they would never relinquish. Roswell was lead in hits by Stokes with two, Raul Guzman, Xavier Lomeli, Brady Villegas, and AJ Palomino and Burrola each had one hit.

Second game

Hobbs 13-5

In the second game of the doubleheader, Hobbs jumped all over the Coyotes from the first inning, when they scored two runs. Hobbs would manage to score a run in every inning as they won, 13-5.

The star in the second game was Guzman as he went 2-for-3, along with Noah Byrd. Byrd made his first appearance of the season on the mound as he struck out two Eagles hitters. At the plate, he laced a base hit up the middle.

“First varsity game this season” Curtis said of Byrd’s first action of the season. “It was good, his performance, he went out and competed and that’s all we can ask.”

Roswell made one last charge in the second game, trailing 7-1 when Stokes singled past shortstop and moved to second when Guzman walked. Designated hitter Xavier Lomeli was hit by a pitch loading the bases, sending up Hunter Meyers-Palma.

Palma hit a gapper to left-center field clearing the bases as three runs scored. Palma was thrown out at third base trying to stretch a double into a triple, which ended the inning. Curtis would use four pitchers. Fielding errors and errors on the base paths would thwart any comeback by the Coyotes, as they could not mount any more challenges.

“I told our team,” Curtis said, “that’s not the way I expect them to play or they expect to play. We’re going to win some and we’re going to lose some, but we have to give ourselves a better chance. We never quit.”

The Eagles would score runs in every inning of the second game. Roswell was led by the hot hitting Guzman in the second game with two singles. Lomeli and Palma each doubles, and Xavier Gonzales, Byrd and Stokes each had singles.

“If we hit like we did these three games,” Curtis said, “and we pitch it and pick up our defense. I think we still have a chance to go in there and take a game or two.”

Roswell (12-8, 0-3, 5A) is off until Thursday when they travel to Carlsbad for a 5 p.m. game.

Lions Hondo Little League baseball action

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Scenes from Lions Hondo Little League Baseball. (David Rocha Photos)

Batter looks the other way

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A batter looks back during a Lions Hondo Little League game on Tuesday. (David Rocha Photo)

Runner safe on base

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A runner stands on a base during Lions Hondo Little League action on Tuesday. (David Rocha Photo)

Ball gets through the defense

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An Angels infielder just misses a groundball during Lions Hondo Little League action on Tuesday. (David Rocha Photo)

Roswell High School April 2019 Students of the Month

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Jordy Noriega

Sponsor:
Sunrise Optimist

Parent:
Maribel Noriega

Angelica Arnero

Sponsor:
Roswell Sertoma

Parents:
Angel and Zoila Arnero

Abril Ibarra

Sponsor:
Hispano Chamber

Parents:
Arturo and Diana Ibarra

Carlos Chan Reyes

Sponsor:
Roswell Rotary

Parents:
Carlos and Elizabeth Chan

Brianna Ruiz

Sponsor:
Altrusa

Parents:
Adrian and Veronica Ruiz

Rayanna Ponce

Sponsor:
Assistance League of Chaves County Silver Belle

Parents:
Jeremiah and Isabel Wilson

Mercedes Martinez

Sponsor:
Assistance League of Chaves County Silver Belle

Parents: Antonio Martinez and Esther Garcia

Julian Orduno

Sponsor:
Pecos Valley Rotary

Parents:
Johnny and Christine Pacheco

Fidel Bolanos Rodriguez

Sponsor:
Kiwanis

Parents:
Alejandro and Ana Bolanos

Sertoma chooses April Students of the Month

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Katlyn Garcia, second from left, and Angelica Arnero are the Roswell Sertoma Club’s April Students of the Month. Club Coordinator Michael Trujillo, left, and Club President David Gomez present them with certificates and gift cards. (Submitted Photo)

Goddard High School student Katlyn Garcia and Roswell High School student Angelica Arnero have been selected for Students of the Month for April by the Roswell Sertoma Club.

Garcia volunteers in various community projects, including Big Brothers/Big Sisters and prison ministries. She is intending to pursue a career in creative art.

Arnero is interested in sports, particularly volleyball and track. She plans to attend New Mexico State University and begin a career as a dental hygienist.

Both young ladies are members of the National Honor Society.

In addition to a certificate of recognition, a $25 Visa gift card was presented to each student and they were advised of the club’s scholarship program. The club awards up to 27 $500 scholarships each semester. Applications for the fall semester will be accepted soon. Applicants must have their final grade point averages and submit their applications no later than July 1. Applications are available on the club’s website, roswellsertoma.org.

Optimists honor April Student of the Month

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Sunrise Optimist Club’s Student of the Month from Roswell High for April, Jordy Noriega, spoke to the club recently during a regular breakfast meeting. Jordy gave a brief biography of his accomplishments while in high school. He also expanded on his future plans for education and a career. Pictured are, from left, Club President, Bud Hewett, presenting a certificate of recognition and a $25 check to Jordy Noriega. Want to know more about Sunrise Optimist Club, or find out what our objectives and goals are for the youth of Roswell? Join us Wednesday morning 7 a.m. at Lovelace Hospital cafeteria/conference room or contact membership chairman Roger K. Burnett at 420-9420. (Submitted Photo)

Gary William Auld

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Gary William Auld, 76, passed away on Wednesday, April 3, 2019, in Roswell, New Mexico.

On July 21, 1942, Gary was born to Gil Auld and Bessie Opstad Auld in Seattle, Washington. At the age of 16, he met the love of his life and future wife of 53 years, Lila Kay Auld. Gary and Kay have a beautiful family that include their son, Chris, daughter-in-law Dawn and Grandson Connor; daughter Debbie, son-in-law Ryan and Granddaughters Emily and Amanda. Gary also leaves behind is brother Dennis and sister-in-law Lynn.

From 1960-1966 Gary attended Portland State and received his B.S. in Psychology.

In 1966 Gary joined the Oregon Air National Guard as a Crew Chief and SSGT and was known as “Airman Auld”. He was part of the 142nd Consolidated Aircraft Maintenance Squadron (142d CAM Sq) and was in the Airforce for 6 years.

He enjoyed working in sales and merchandising for 25 years and after retirement from the Coors Brewing Company he became a manager/owner of the Roadrunner Mobile Home Park in 2005. Gary was a man of faith and was President and Property Manager at St. Mark’s Lutheran Church. He was the Charter Representative for the Boy Scouts for several years.

He had an amazing personality and treasured spending time with family and friends. Gary was an avid golfer and sports fan who loved the Broncos.

Gary’s life motto was Listen-Learn-Lead.

It is with a thankful heart that we extend our gratitude to all those that were involved in Gary’s care.

A Celebration of Life Service will be held at St. Mark’s Lutheran Church, 2911 North Main, Roswell, NM 88201 on Saturday, April 20, 2019 at 11:00am. Please wear something RED.

In lieu of sending flowers, please send donations to St. Mark’s Lutheran Church.

Arrangements have been entrusted to Ballard Funeral Home and Crematory. An online registry can be accessed at www.ballardfuneralhome.com.

Theresa June White (Terry Lindsey)

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Theresa June White (Terry Lindsey) 65 years old passed away March 25, 2019 due to Mytonic Dystrophy at her home. She was born in Artesia, NM October 26, 1953 to Steve and Anita Lindsey.

Terry is survived by her beloved husband Ron White in Albuquerque, NM for 35 years, her mother Anita Hartley, sister and brother-in-law Debbie and Van Blessing, brother, Mike Lindsey in Roswell, step brother Ricky Hartley and his wife Terri in El Paso, and Randy Hartley in Indiana. She has several nieces Lindsey Blessing Parsons, Shannon Hartley and Rachael Hartley and nephew Warren Hartley and Zachary and several great nieces and nephews She is also survived by her Mother-in-law Varena White and sister-in-law Darlene and Bill Jones in Texas. She has an aunt and uncle and cousins in New Mexico and Texas. She left behind a beloved pet dog “Shorty” and loving neighborhood friends.

Terry graduated from Roswell High School in 1971, she had worked at various jobs Coca Cola Plant, Robert O. Anderson and Mountain Bell. She had retired from Mountain Bell. Terry and Ron loved watching sports together, her favorite team Dallas Cowboys.

Terry and and her husband decided on no memorial service; she was cremated and her ashes will spread in memorable locations. “Death leaves a heartache no one can heal love leaves a memory no on can steal.”

Jose Reza Dominguez

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Jose Reza Dominguez, age 88, passed away Friday, April 5, 2019. He was born in the Presidio, TX area January 22, 1931. After moving to Artesia, NM and marrying his wife on November 24, 1950, they moved to Roswell, NM where he ran East 2nd Shell by the railroad tracks. After suffering a heart attack, colon cancer, and a stroke he lived the rest of his life in Roswell. He is survived by his wife of 68 years, Juana V Dominguez; two sisters and one brother, of seven siblings; one son, of three; six grandchildren; 17 great-grandchildren; seven great-great-grandchildren.

There will be a mass at St Johns Catholic Church, 506 S Lincoln Ave, on Friday April 26, 2019, at 10:00 am.

James Wesley Smith

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James Wesley Smith, 86, went to heaven on March 6, 2019.  the family will hold a Celebration of Life Memorial Gathering at 10:00 am on Saturday, April 20, 2019 at Enchanted Hills Park in Roswell.

James was born to Clyde Smith and Loma Frazier on September 7, 1932.  They were farmers James grew up learning to work hard.  He became a plumber by trade and worked many years in this profession.  He loved country music and he was an outstanding country and western dancer.  Dancing was one his favorite things to do.  He was known by those who lived him as Shorty.  James was a loving dad and granddad and will be dearlty missed.

Jame is proceded in death by his parents.  Clyde and Loma Smith; his daughter, Judy Darlene Lane; and his wife, Barbara Smith.

James is survived by his son-in-law.  Albert Lane; his granddaughter Jennifer Williams and her husband Nick; his granddaughter Kimberly Putnam and her husband TJ; his great-grandchildren Devin Williams, Koltin Willis.  Madelynn, Maya, and Keigan McCullough:  very dear friends Desmond williams. Anna Sanchez. and Judy Powers.

See Robin Scott perform in Cloudcroft tonight

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Carlsbad

Until April 30

Holey Landscape! — Guadalupe Mountains Annual Youth Poster Contest

Guadalupe Mountains National Park, in partnership with the National Cave and Karst Research Institute, invites all young artists between the ages of 6-17 to participate in its fourth annual Youth Poster Contest. This year’s theme focuses on karst and its importance in the natural world. Interested artists can download the 2019 poster contest entry form on the Guadalupe Mountains website. For more information, visit nps.gov/gumo or call Elizabeth Jackson at 915-828-3251, ext. 2300.

Cloudcroft

April 19

Robin Scott concert

Robin Scott performs at Cloudcroft Brewing Company, 1301 Burro Ave., at 6 p.m. For more information, visit cloudcroftbrewing.com or call 575-682-2337.

Alamogordo

April 19 and 20

“Mary Poppins — The Musical”

Alamogordo Music Theater presents “Mary Poppins — The Musical” live on stage of the Flickinger Center for Performing Arts, 1110 New York Ave. Showings are Fridays and Saturdays at 7 p.m. and on Sunday at 2 p.m. For more information, call 575-437-2202.

Alamogordo

April 20

Easter in the Park

The city of Alamogordo Community Services Department and Burt Broadcasting, Inc. are holding the annual Easter in the Park with food and craft vendors, an Easter egg hunt for kids and adults as well as games. The event will be at Washington Park Stage. For more information, email Joshua Sides at jsides@ci.alamogordo.nm.us or call 575-439-4279.

Artesia

April 20

Tabletop game

The Artesia Public Library, 205 W. Quay Ave., hosts tabletop gaming D&D ruins of Avalon, episode 1: Escape the Shattered Citadel, from 2 to 6 p.m. For more information, visit its Facebook event page.

Carlsbad

April 20

Annual Spring Egg Hunt

The New Mexico State University Carlsbad hosts its annual Spring Egg Hunt at the Beach Bandshell at 10 a.m. All ages are welcome. Some baskets will be provided. For more information, visit its Facebook event page.

Midway

April 20

Cumberland Park Grand Opening

Join the Roswell Chamber of Commerce Redcoats at noon for the opening ceremony and ribbon cutting of Cumberland Park, corner of Templeton and Day streets. For more information, visit roswellnm.org or call 575-623-5695.

Artesia

April 23 and 26

Auditions for “Follies”

Artesia Community Theatre is holding auditions for its annual Follies on both days at 6:30 p.m. at the Ocotillo Performing Arts Center, 310 W. Main St. The show will be in June at Hopscotch Brewery. Specific dates will be released on a later date. For more information about the audition, visit its Facebook page or contact Kandese Green at 575-495-5562 or Lindsay Waugh at 580-206-4795.

Artesia

April 25

The Landscape of Guitar

The Landscape of Guitar performs at the Ocotillo Performing Arts Center, 310 W. Main St., at 7 p.m. The Landscape of Guitar is an animated painting concert experience with groundbreaking art and music. Award-winning singer and songwriters Patchouli and Terra Guitarra, one of the top nuevo-flamenco groups, create a live symphony of color and sound. A combination of the harmonies of Simon & Garfunkel, the guitars of the Gipsy Kings and the colors of Van Gogh. For more information, visit artesiaartscouncil.com, email boxoffice@artesiaartscouncil.com or call 575-746-4212.

Rio Rancho

April 25

Jeff Dunham “Passively Aggressive”

Tickets are on sale now for ventriloquist Jeff Dunham’s “Passively Aggressive” show at the Santa Ana Star Center, 54 Jemez Canyon Dam Road, Santa Ana Pueblo, at 7 p.m. Dunham’s show is sold out fast, anybody interested in seeing the comedian with his troupe of characters (Achmed the Dead Terrorist, Melvin the Superhero Guy, Bubba, José Jalapeño on a Stick and cranky old Walter), should get their tickets as soon as possible. For more information, visit santaanastar.com or call 505-867-0000.

Cloudcroft

April 26

Wait for What?! concert

The band Wait for What?! performs at the Cloudcroft Brewing Company, 1301 Burro Ave., at 6 p.m. For more information, visit cloudcroftbrewing.com or call 575-682-2337.

Artesia

April 27

Child Safety Fair

The ninth annual Child Safety Fair is hosted by Artesia Police Department at Guadalupe Park from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. All local law and fire agencies and businesses come together to work with the community to provide information to help protect the children kids. The free event features music, food, dancing, a doughnut eating contest, mascot dance-off, face painting, a car seat clinic and activities for all ages. For more information, call Cpl. Baca at 575-746-5000.

Alamogordo

April 27

Community Earth Day Fair

The 26th annual Community Earth Day Fair takes place at Alameda Park Zoo from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. The free event will have more than 80 vendors, including local nonprofits, gardening clubs, educational booths and several food booths. A mass release of butterflies will take place at 11 a.m. For more information, email cpd@alamogordo.com or call 575-437-6120.

Alamogordo

April 27

MUFON New Mexico meeting

The Mutual UFO Network New Mexico state chapter meets at the Alamogordo Public Library, 920 Oregon Ave., from 1:30 to 4 p.m. New Mexico State Director, Don Burleson, is hosting the free event. A slide show on the Holloman Air Force Base UFO landing and its relation to the Socorro incident and information regarding recent cases reportet throughout the state. For more information, visit its Facebook page @nmmufon, call 575-622-0855 or 860-324-7614.

Ruidoso/Alto

April 27

The Jive Aces show

The United Kingdom’s No. 1 busiest swing and jive band, The Jive Aces, present their rollicking Jump, Jive & Wail show at the Spencer Theater at 7 p.m. The show features special guest vocalist Gina Haley, daughter of famed “Rock Around The Clock” hit artist Bill Haley, The Jive Aces plan an evening of hot jazz, the very best in ‘40s and ‘50s jive, rhythm and blues, swing and vintage rock ‘n’ roll. For more information, visit spencertheater.com or call 575-336-4800.

If you would like your event listed on the entertainment calendar, please email vision@rdrnews.com or call 622-7710 ext. 309.

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